skip to main content

Honors/AP US History Syllabus

3 months ago

Honors Foundation/APUSH History Syllabus

                                                                                     


Foundations/AP United States History-2019-2020 

Nick Long, Ninety Six High School

School Phone: 543-2911  Planning 2nd Block e-mail: clong@greenwood52.org 

This course is designed to help the student understand the development of America from the settlement of the indigenous peoples to challenges faced by the United States during the 21st century.  During the semester the student will have to discuss, write, and think about the trials & tribulations, failures, and success of the people that are America. This course is designed to reflect that of college classroom setting. The work will be extensive as this class is set to replicate a college classroom setting.  

South Carolina United States History Content Themes

United States History and the Constitution In the United States History and the Constitution course, students will employ the skills of a historian to explore the foundation of the American Republic and the expansion and disunion of the United States. Students will investigate the impact of American industrialism and capitalism, including being drawn into world wars, on American politics and geopolitics. Through the lens of the Cold War, students will study the contemporary era including the age of technological development, increased civic participation, and political party realignment. Instruction should utilize the historical thinking skills and themes developed for grade 11. The progression of developmentally appropriate historical thinking skills begins in kindergarten and builds with each year of history instruction. These historical thinking skills are aligned with the Profile of the South Carolina Graduate of world-class knowledge, world-class skills, and life and career characteristics. The indicators of standard one represent the skills utilized by students in each grade level to further explore the content. These skills have been deconstructed to aid in the scaffolding of student thinking and are not to be taught in isolation. The Social Studies grade-level standards can be categorized into content- and discipline-specific themes. These themes allow for connections to be made between content when teaching chronologically, the ability to teach thematically rather than chronologically, and to support project or problem based learning. These themes also allow students the opportunity to create change by engaging in civic participation. To encourage inquiry, the grade 11 United States History and the Constitution standards are constructed around the following eight themes: 

THEME 1: AMERICAN AND NATIONAL IDENTITY (NAT) This theme focuses on how and why definitions of American and national identity and values have developed among the diverse and changing population of North America as well as on related topics, such as citizenship, constitutionalism, foreign policy, assimilation, and American exceptionalism. 

THEME 2: WORK, EXCHANGE, AND TECHNOLOGY (WXT) This theme focuses on the factors behind the development of systems of economic exchange, particularly the role of technology, economic markets, and government. 

THEME 3: GEOGRAPHY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (GEO) This theme focuses on the role of geography and both the natural and human-made environments in the social and political developments in what would become the United States. 

THEME 4: MIGRATION AND SETTLEMENT (MIG) This theme focuses on why and how the various people who moved to and within the United States both adapted to and transformed their new social and physical environments. 

THEME 5: POLITICS AND POWER (PCE) This theme focuses on how different social and political groups have influenced society and government in the United States as well as how political beliefs and institutions have changed over time.

 

THEME 6: AMERICA IN THE WORLD (WOR) This theme focuses on the interactions between nations that affected North American history in the colonial period and on the influence of the United States on world affairs. 

THEME 7: AMERICAN AND REGIONAL CULTURE (ARC) This theme focuses on the how and why national, regional, and group cultures developed and changed as well as how culture has shaped government policy and the economy.

 THEME 8: SOCIAL STRUCTURES (SOC) This theme focuses on how and why systems of social organization develop and change as well as the impact that these systems have on the broader society.

Essential Thinking Skills and Processes

1.Developments and Processes- Identify and Explain historical developments and processes.

.

2.Sourcing and Situation- Analyze sourcing and situation of primary and secondary sources.

3. Claims and Evidence in Sources- Analyze arguments in primary and secondary sources.

 

 

4. Contextualization- Analyze the context of historical events, developments, or processes. 

5. Making Connections- Using historical reasoning processes (comparison, causation, continuity, and change), analyze patterns and connections between and among historical developments and processes.

6. Argumentation- Develop an argument.

Reasoning Processes

  1. Comparison

  2. Causation

  3. Continuity and Change

SC State US History Standards

Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of the Atlantic World on the regional and national development of republicanism and federalism from 1607–1815.

Standard 2: Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between economic and continental expansion and the evolving disagreements over natural rights and federalism from 1803–1877

Standard 3: Demonstrate an understanding of how innovation and industrialization impacted demographic change, reform movements, and American identity from 1862–1924.

Standard 4: Demonstrate an understanding of how the American identity both at home and abroad was affected by imperialism, world conflict, and economic boom and bust in the period 1893 to 1945.

Standard 5: Demonstrate the impact of America’s global leadership on technological advancements, the transition to a post-industrial society, and ongoing debates over identity in the period 1945–present.

  • All Standards have numerous indicators that relate to the overall standard. These standards can be found on the South Carolina State Dept of Education webpage.*

AP US History Standards

These standards and content can be found in the link on my webpage.

Expectations -In order to ensure a productive and stimulating learning environment there are a few rules that need to be adhered to:

 

Be Prepared- Have what is needed daily

Be Prompt- Be on time

Be Polite- Be respectful to teacher and others

Be Positive- Good Attitude

Be Productive- Do what you are asked, No excuses

Be the Standard- Be a model student and citizen

All students are expected to follow all rules and procedures printed in the Ninety Six High School student Handbook

Daily Requirements:

  1. One Binder for Handouts and Syllabus, 

  2. One 5 Subject Spiral Notebook

  3. Pencils and Paper.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Consequences for violating class rules:

  1. Warning

  2. detention  and / or telephone conference or other contact with parents

  3. Referral to office

*I  reserve the right to bypass the first two consequences if circumstances deem this action necessary. 

Grading :

Grades will be calculated on a hundred point scale. Grades will be calculated using a point system. 

Homework/Classwork/ Quizzes will be calculated as minor grades ranging anywhere 10-50 points per assignment.

Tests/Projects/Essays/DBQS will be be categorized as major grades and will be scored out of 100 points.   

Final Examination will be scored out of 100 points and will be 20 percent of the student's final grade. 

Major Tests/Essays/Projects/DBQs – Tests, essays, projects, and DBQs  are comprised of information from both your text and class notes.  It is important that you take notes during class to ensure better understanding of the material. Test will be in AP Format. Most multiple choice will adhere to a specific stimulus. The stimulus can be a primary/secondary source, graph, or chart. DBQS and LEQs will follow a rubric given in class. If you are absent on test day, you are responsible for making-up the test. 

Homework/Daily Assignments - May be assigned at any time. Homework and daily assignments are practice and a way to demonstrate learning that has taken place in class or during reading assignments. SAQs and Quizzes are examples of this type of assignment.

Quizzes- allow me to measure comprehension and your depth of knowledge of the material.

Class Participation/Notebooks-Students are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Social Studies are more than just “names and dates” Students are schooled in logical debate skills and public speaking. Student participation shows insight into the student’s comprehension of the subject. Students are required to keep a notebook. Students will be given notes, maps, study guides, handouts and other material. 

I look forward to working with you and your parents in order to provide the best education possible. Your education is something no one can take away from you so take advantage of this opportunity. Please sign and have your parents sign the bottom of this syllabus stating that you have read and understand the classroom rules and course objectives. 

Thanks, Coach Long



                                                                                     




CP Syllabus/Class Procedures

3 months ago

By Christopher Long

 

Foundations/United States History-2019-2020 

Nick Long, Ninety Six High School

School Phone: 543-2911  Planning 2nd Block e-mail: clong@greenwood52.org 

This course is designed to help the student understand the development of America from the settlement of the indigenous peoples to challenges faced by the United States during the 21st century.  During the semester the student will have to discuss, write, and think about the trials & tribulations, failures, and success of the people that are America.  

South Carolina United States History Content Themes

United States History and the Constitution In the United States History and the Constitution course, students will employ the skills of a historian to explore the foundation of the American Republic and the expansion and disunion of the United States. Students will investigate the impact of American industrialism and capitalism, including being drawn into world wars, on American politics and geopolitics. Through the lens of the Cold War, students will study the contemporary era including the age of technological development, increased civic participation, and political party realignment. Instruction should utilize the historical thinking skills and themes developed for grade 11. The progression of developmentally appropriate historical thinking skills begins in kindergarten and builds with each year of history instruction. These historical thinking skills are aligned with the Profile of the South Carolina Graduate of world-class knowledge, world-class skills, and life and career characteristics. The indicators of standard one represent the skills utilized by students in each grade level to further explore the content. These skills have been deconstructed to aid in the scaffolding of student thinking and are not to be taught in isolation. The Social Studies grade-level standards can be categorized into content- and discipline-specific themes. These themes allow for connections to be made between content when teaching chronologically, the ability to teach thematically rather than chronologically, and to support project or problem based learning. These themes also allow students the opportunity to create change by engaging in civic participation. To encourage inquiry, the grade 11 United States History and the Constitution standards are constructed around the following six themes: 

American Culture and Identity – The American Culture and Identity theme encourages the study of various cultural groups, movements, and the development of distinct ideologies, including American exceptionalism, throughout periods of American history. Additionally, cultural movements and political ideologies impacted national politics, foreign policies, and societal development. 

Capitalism and Technological Innovation – The Capitalism and Technological Innovation theme encourages the study of the development of the American free enterprise system and its role in the promotion of exchange, industry, and invention within the economy and its impact on American society and politics. The American government's role includes promoting economic growth and regulating significant inequalities resulting from the free enterprise system. 

Expansion, Regionalism, and Union – The Expansion, Regionalism, and Union theme encourages the study of American expansionism and the simultaneous process of socioeconomic division, unity, and the proper role of the federal government in regulation. Over time, American regions, political factions, and national institutions have experienced divergent and convergent economic, political, and social perspectives. 

Founding Principles and Political Institutions – The Founding Principles and Political Institutions theme encourages the study of core American political values and institutions, founding documents, essential political processes, and constitutional debates. expressed in seminal documents, serve as the basis of unity, debates, and compromises over time.

 Migration and Mobility – The Migration and Mobility theme encourages the study of the movement of humans into and throughout North America including reactions to the resulting demographic, economic, environmental, and political changes. Push and pull factors, significant migratory patterns, and the natural environment have also impacted movements in American history. 

Natural Rights and Social Development – The Natural Rights and Social Development theme encourages the study of fundamental American values such as inalienable human rights, social reform movements, social legislation and the documents therein. American social values were shaped over time as evidenced in social reform and the resulting legislation. Initiatives undertaken in order to secure the rights and the blessings of liberty to disenfranchised groups will also be explored.

Essential Skills

CO: Comparison- Utilize similarities and differences among multiple historical developments over culture, time, and place to create a comparative analysis. To demonstrate their ability to use the skill of comparison, students should: ● identify the characteristics of historical events over time, place, and culture. ● categorize historical events according to similarities and differences. ● construct conclusions about historical events. ● analyze the reasons for similarities and differences. 

CE: Causation- Evaluate significant turning points, including related causes and effects that affect historical continuity and change. To demonstrate their ability to use the skill of causation, students should: ● justify the long-term and short-term causes and consequences of significant events. ● categorize and compare causes and consequences of various historical events. ● differentiate causation from correlation or context.

 P: Periodization-Summarize, analyze, and assess the methods historians use to categorize historical developments in order to create historical periodization. To demonstrate their ability to think in terms of periodization, students should: ● identify major turning points in American history. ● define and understand the characteristics of an era. ● describe the methods by which historians categorize events into eras. ● summarize major events and developments according to historical eras and themes.

 

CX: Context- Justify how the relationship between various historical themes and multiple historical developments create a multifaceted context when analyzing significant events. To demonstrate their ability to use context, students should: ● distinguish events based on time and place. ● establish connections between relative historical topics. ● connect specific events to broad historical themes and developments.

 CC: Continuities and Changes- Evaluate significant turning points and theme-based patterns of continuities and changes within a period, including catalysts for those changes. To demonstrate their ability to understand continuities and changes, students should: ● define continuity and change. ● identify patterns of continuity and change chronologically and thematically. ● compare the relative importance of continuities and changes among and transcending periods.

 E: Evidence- Identify, interpret, and utilize different forms of evidence, including primary and secondary sources, used in an inquirybased study of history. To demonstrate their ability to use evidence in the study of history, students should: ● use historical thinking skills to weigh primary sources and identify point of view, including the effect of the author’s position, group affiliation, or specific beliefs. ● discern similarities and differences among multiple points of view. ● utilize multiple points of view to construct a historical argument 

SC State US History Standards

Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of the Atlantic World on the regional and national development of republicanism and federalism from 1607–1815.

Standard 2: Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between economic and continental expansion and the evolving disagreements over natural rights and federalism from 1803–1877

Standard 3: Demonstrate an understanding of how innovation and industrialization impacted demographic change, reform movements, and American identity from 1862–1924.

Standard 4: Demonstrate an understanding of how the American identity both at home and abroad was affected by imperialism, world conflict, and economic boom and bust in the period 1893 to 1945.

Standard 5: Demonstrate the impact of America’s global leadership on technological advancements, the transition to a post-industrial society, and ongoing debates over identity in the period 1945–present.

  • All Standards have numerous indicators that relate to the overall standard. These standards can be found on the South Carolina State Dept of Education webpage.*

Expectations -In order to ensure a productive and stimulating learning environment there are a few rules that need to be adhered to:

 

Be Prepared- Have what is needed daily

Be Prompt- Be on time

Be Polite- Be respectful to teacher and others

Be Positive- Good Attitude

Be Productive- Do what you are asked, No excuses

Be the Standard- Be a model student and citizen

All students are expected to follow all rules and procedures printed in the Ninety Six High School student Handbook

Daily Requirements:

  1. One Binder for Handouts and Syllabus, 

  2. One 5 Subject Spiral Notebook

  3. Pencils and Paper.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Consequences for violating class rules:

  1. Warning

  2. detention  and / or telephone conference or other contact with parents

  3. Referral to office

*I  reserve the right to bypass the first two consequences if circumstances deem this action necessary. 

Grading :

Grades will be calculated on a hundred point scale. Grades will be calculated using a point system. 

Homework/Classwork/ Quizzes will be calculated as minor grades ranging anywhere 10-50 points per assignment.

Tests/Projects/Essays/DBQS will be be categorized as major grades and will be scored out of 100 points.   

Final Examination will be scored out of 100 points and will be 20 percent of the student's final grade. 

Major Tests – Tests are comprised of information from both your text and class notes.  It is important that you take notes during class to ensure better understanding of the material. If you are absent on test day, you are responsible for making-up the test. Homework/Daily Assignments - May be assigned at any time. Homework and daily assignments are practice and a way to demonstrate learning that has taken place in class or during reading assignments.

Quizzes- allow me to measure comprehension and your depth of knowledge of the material.

Class Participation/Notebooks-Students are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Social Studies are more than just “names and dates” Students are schooled in logical debate skills and public speaking. Student participation shows insight into the student’s comprehension of the subject. Students are required to keep a notebook. Students will be given notes, maps, study guides, handouts and other material. 


Letter to Parents/Students

3 months ago

Dear Students and Parents,

My name is Christopher Long and I am excited to have your child as a part of my classroom. This is my sixth year in the classroom. I am a graduate of Lander University and I received a Bachelor of Science Degree in History with an emphasis in secondary education. I pursued and received my middle school certification over the summer of 2014. When outside the classroom, I enjoy coaching, golfing, hunting, and fishing. I also enjoy spending time with my wife and daughter as well as watching South Carolina Gamecock football on Saturdays during the fall and Atlanta Braves baseball during the spring and summer. I am excited about the opportunity of providing your child with the best possible education in a safe learning environment that fosters growth and development of your child’s future. I can assure you that I will do my very best to make sure your child accomplishes these set goals. The topic of Social Studies offers the opportunity to explore and relate with events in the past and apply them to the present. It also offers a chance for students to learn how to become productive members of society. I will use a variety of techniques and exercises in the classroom with your child that I have learned and practiced throughout my collegiate and teaching experience. For instance, students will analyze primary sources throughout the entirety of this course. Analyzing and using primary sources improves critical thinking and problem solving skills which will be critical for your child to know as he or she enters higher grades and pursues his or her future career. Other exercises and practices that your child will practice are found in the syllabus. If there are any questions or concerns about the upcoming year, please feel free to contact me via email.

                                                                                                                                              Sincerely,

                                                                                                                                               Christopher Long