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Homework/Quizzes/Tests

3 months ago

Homework, Quizzes and Tests will be assigned in each students Google Classroom. Please sign up so you can see what they have assigned or missing assignments.
The Students will use Mastery Connect to test on the standards they are learning.
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8th Grade Syllabus

3 months ago

By John Coster

8th Grade Social Studies/ South Carolina History

Edgewood Middle School

864-543-3511

John Coster

jcoster@greenwood52.org

8th Grade social studies will focus on the history of South Carolina and its role in building the United States of America.  Over the course of the year, students will list, compare, differentiate, analyze, and critique the history of South Carolina and its historical figures.  Our goal for the class is for students to develop an understanding of the rich American history that exists in South Carolina and examine the many different economic, political, and social aspects of South Carolina’s growth in the United States of America. 


Class Procedures:

LISTEN and Follow Directions

Respect adults and other students

Be on task

Turn in assignments on time

Clean your area

Put materials back where you found them

Enter and exit the room quietly 

 

*All students will abide by school procedures according to the student handbook.


 Topics to be covered are:

First Nine Weeks

  • Early Settlements of SC

  • Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans

  • Colonial America

  • Triangular Trade/ Slave Trade

  • The American Revolution

Second Nine Weeks

  • The Creation of the United States Constitution

  • The Antebellum South

  • The Plantation System

  • The Nullification Crisis

  • Causes of the Civil War

  • The Civil War


Third Nine Weeks

  • Reconstruction of the South

  • Political Factions in SC

  • The Conservative Era

  • The Populist Movement

  • Education in SC

  • The Progressive Movement

  • World War I


Fourth Nine Weeks

  • The Roaring Twenties

  • The Great Depression

  • World War II

  • Tourism

  • Strom Thurmond

  • The Civil Rights Movement

  • Modern Day South Carolina

Materials Needed

  • Textbook:  The South Carolina Journey (2012)

  • Three Ring Binder/ Notebook

  • Pencils/ pens

  • Colored pencils

Grades will be calculated on a hundred point scale. However grades, will be categorized as either minor or major grades. The average of the sum of all minor grades will be 70% of the student's final grade. The average of the sum of all students major grades will be 30% of the student's final grade.

Homework/Classwork/ Quizzes will be categorized as minor grades.

Tests/Projects will be be categorized as major grades.                       

Methods of Assessment/Grades: Types of grades that will be counted:  Major Test/Project Grades, Minor Grades-Quizzes/Classwork/Homework, and Class Participation.

A.   Minor grades are designed to help the student recount recently taught material in class.

1. Quizzes will be given throughout the course. Students should expect quizzes on a weekly basis. These quizzes do not have to be announced in class.

2. Classwork and Homework will be given throughout the course as well. Students are expected to turn in the work on the assigned due date. Failure to do so will result in a deduction of one letter grade per day for unexcused work until the assignment is received. If the student is absent, then the student will have the designated time to make up the missed assignment.

B.  Test/Project grades are designed to measure how well the student has mastered material and skill level of the state standards.

     1.  Unit tests will be given approximately every few weeks.

     2. Class Projects will be assigned accordingly throughout the semester.

    

C. Class Participation will count as one major test grade for the class. Students can lose participation points from failing to follow class procedures, sleeping in class, and exceeding restroom passes. For every infraction three participation points will be deducted from the participation grade. The infraction will be noted and dated. The student will be warned before the infraction is given to him/her. Student participation is very important during whole group and small group discussions. Students will also be creating digital notebooks. The student’s participation is key to succeeding in class.

Note Taking- Students will be required to take notes during class. Taking valuable and concise notes will help student performance on other assignments. Understanding key vocabulary and concepts, depends on effective note taking as well.

Make Up Work: Students will be responsible for retrieving their make-up work from the Google classroom when absent. Students will be given the time to make up the assignment during homeroom, social time, or any free time that has been granted. The student is responsible for completing this work on time and turning it back into the teacher upon completion. Students will be assigned a partner to get with, concerning missing notes taken during class. 


Grading on a Points Scale

  • Major Grades 30% of student grade, Minor Grades 70% of student grade 

  • Major Grades

Tests, Projects(if assigned), Announced Quizzes

Minor Grades

Pop Quizzes, Classwork, Homework 

  • Extra Credit will not be given


Grading Scale

  • 90 - 100 = A

  • 80 - 89 = B

  • 70 - 79 = C

  • 60 - 69 = D

  • 59 or below = F

  • Students who score a 59 or below on a test will have the option to make up the test.  However, the student will not receive the same test but will receive an essay test on the material being re-tested.


7th Grade Syllabus

3 months ago

7th Grade Social Studies : Contemporary Cultures

Edgewood Middle School

John Coster

jcoster@greenwood52.org

Course Description: Social studies in the seventh grade is a course in contemporary cultures that continues from the examination of early cultures in grade six. In grade seven, students examine the history and geography of human societies from 1600 to the present. They learn about the growing interaction among these societies as well as the exchange of ideas, beliefs, technologies, and commodities among them. Students also address the continuing growth of the political and economic ideas that shaped the modern world. They study the concepts of reason and authority, the natural rights of human beings, the divine right of kings, the beginning of modern science, the development of limited government, and the roots of modern-day tensions and issues.

Class Materials- One Binder for Handouts and Syllabus, One 5 Subject Spiral Notebook, Colored Pencils, Pencils and Paper.

Grading Scale:    

A = 90 – 100

B = 80 – 89

C = 70 – 79

D = 60 – 69

F = Below 59

Grades will be calculated on a hundred point scale. However grades, will be categorized as either minor or major grades. The average of the sum of all minor grades will be 70% of the student's final grade. The average of the sum of all students major grades will be 30% of the student's final grade.

Homework/Classwork/ Quizzes will be categorized as minor grades.

Tests/Projects will be be categorized as major grades.                       

Methods of Assessment/Grades: Types of grades that will be counted:  Major Test/Project Grades, Minor Grades-Quizzes/Classwork/Homework, and Class Participation.

A.   Minor grades are designed to help the student recount recently taught material in class.

1. Quizzes will be given throughout the course. Students should expect quizzes on a weekly basis. These quizzes do not have to be announced in class.

2. Classwork and Homework will be given throughout the course as well. Students are expected to turn in the work on the assigned due date. Failure to do so will result in a deduction of one letter grade per day for unexcused work until the assignment is received. If the student is absent, then the student will have the designated time to make up the missed assignment.

B.  Test/Project grades are designed to measure how well the student has mastered material and skill level of the state standards.

     1.  Unit tests will be given approximately every few weeks.

     2. Class Projects will be assigned accordingly throughout the semester.

    

C. Class Participation will count as one major test grade for the class. Students can lose participation points from failing to follow class procedures, sleeping in class, and exceeding restroom passes. For every infraction three participation points will be deducted from the participation grade. The infraction will be noted and dated. The student will be warned before the infraction is given to him/her. Student participation is very important during whole group and small group discussions. Students will also be creating digital notebooks. The student’s participation is key to succeeding in class.

Note Taking- Students will be required to take notes during class. Taking valuable and concise notes will help student performance on other assignments. Understanding key vocabulary and concepts, depends on effective note taking as well.

Make Up Work: Students will be responsible for retrieving their make-up work from the Google classroom when absent. Students will be given the time to make up the assignment during homeroom, social time, or any free time that has been granted. The student is responsible for completing this work on time and turning it back into the teacher upon completion. Students will be assigned a partner to get with, concerning missing notes taken during class. 

Class Procedures:

LISTEN and Follow Directions

Respect adults and other students

Be on task

Turn in assignments on time

Clean your area

Put materials back where you found them

Enter and exit the room quietly 

 

*All students will abide by school procedures according to the student handbook.

7th Grade Social Studies Standards and Timeline:

1ST NINE WEEKS

1. Review basic geography skills (continents, oceans, and basic map skills). 

2. Use a map or series of maps to identify the colonial expansion of European powers in African, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas through 1770.  7-1.1

3. Explain how technological and scientific advances, including navigational advances and the use of gunpowder, affected various parts of the world politically, socially, and economically and contributed to the power of European nations. 7-1.2

4. Compare how European nations exercised political and economic influenced differently in the Americas, including trading-post empires, plantation colonies, and settler colonies. 7-1.3

5. Summarize the characteristics of European colonial power and explain its effects on the society and culture of African nations, including instances of participation in resistance to the slave trade. 7-1.4

6. Summarize the characteristics of European colonial powers in Asia and their effects on the society and culture of Asia, including global trade patterns and the spread of various religions. 7-1.5

7. Explain the emergence of capitalism, including the significance of mercantilism, a developing market economy, an expanding international trade, and the rise of the middle class. 7-1.6

8. Summarize the essential characteristics of the limited government in England following the Glorious Revolution and the unlimited governments in France and Russia, including some of the restraints placed on a limited government’s power and how authoritarian and totalitarian systems are considered unlimited governments.  7-2.1

9. Summarize the ideas of the Enlightenment that influenced democratic thought and social institutions throughout the world including the political philosophies of John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Baron de Montesquieu. 7-2.3

10. Explain how the scientific revolution challenged authority and influenced Enlightenment philosophers, including the importance of the use of reason, the challenges to the Catholic Church, and the contributions of Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton. 7.2.2

11. Explain the effects of the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution on the power of the monarchy in England and on limited government. 7-2.4

12. Explain how the Enlightenment influenced the American and French revolutions leading  to the formation of limited forms of government, including the relationship between people and their government, the role of constitutions, the characteristics of shared powers, the protection of individual rights, and the promotion of the common good. 7-2.5

2ND NINE WEEKS

1.     Explain how the Enlightenment influenced the American and French revolutions leading to the formation of limited forms of government, including the relationship between people and their government, the role of constitutions, the characteristics of shared powers, the protection of individual rights, and the promotion of the common good. 7-2.5

2.     7-3.1 Explain the causes, key events, and outcomes of the French Revolution, including the storming of the Bastille, the Reign of Terror, and Napoleon’s rise to power.

3.     7-3.2 Analyze the effects of the Napoleonic Wars on the development and spread of nationalism in Europe, including the Congress of Vienna, the revolutionary movements of 1830 and 1848, and the unification of Germany and Italy.

4.     7-3.3 Explain how the Haitian, Mexican, and South American revolutions were influenced by Enlightenment ideas as well as by the spread of nationalism and the revolutionary movements in the United States and Europe.

5.     7-3.4 Explain how the Industrial Revolution caused economic, cultural, and political changes around the world.

6.     7-3.5 Analyze the ways that industrialization contributed to imperialism in India, Japan, China, and African regions, including the need for new markets and raw materials, the Open Door Policy, and the Berlin Conference of 1884.

7.     7-3.6 Explain reactions to imperialism that resulted from growing nationalism, including the Zulu wars, the Sepoy Rebellion, the Opium Wars, the Boxer Rebellion, and the Meiji Restoration.

8.     7-3.7 Explain the causes and effects of the Spanish-American War as a reflection of American imperialist interests, including acquisitions, military occupations, and status as an emerging world power.

3RD NINE WEEKS

1. 7-4.1 Explain the causes and course of World War I, including militarism, alliances, imperialism, nationalism, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the impact of Russia’s withdrawal from, and the United States entry into the war.

2. 7-4.2 Explain the outcomes of World War I, including the creation of President Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points, the Treaty of Versailles, the shifts in national borders, and the League of Nations.

3. 7-4.3 Explain the causes and effects of the worldwide depression that took place in the 1930s, including the effects of the economic crash of 1929.

4. 7-4.4 Compare the ideologies of socialism, communism, fascism, and Nazism and their influence on the rise of totalitarian governments after World War I in Italy, Germany, Japan, and the Soviet Union as a response to the worldwide depression.

5. 7-4.5 Summarize the causes and course of World War II, including drives for empire, appeasement and isolationism, the invasion of Poland, the Battle of Britain, the invasion of the Soviet Union, the “Final Solution,” the Lend-Lease program, Pearl Harbor, Stalingrad, the campaigns in North Africa and the Mediterranean, the D-Day invasion, the island-hopping campaigns, and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

6. 7-4.6 Analyze the Holocaust and its impact on European society and  Jewish culture, including Nazi policies to eliminate the Jews and other minorities, the Nuremberg trials, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the rise of nationalism in Southwest Asia (Middle East), the creation of the state of Israel, and the resultant conflicts in the region.

7. 7-5.1 Compare the political and economic ideologies of the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

8. 7-5.2 Summarize the impact of the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the United Nations, and the Warsaw Pact on the course of the Cold War.

9. 7-5.3 Explain the spread of communism in Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, including the ideas of the satellite state containment, and the domino theory.

10. 7-5.4 Analyze the political and technological competition between the Soviet Union and the United States for global influence, including the Korean Conflict, the Berlin Wall, the Vietnam War, the Cuban missile crisis, the “space race,” and the threat of nuclear annihilation.

11. 7-5.5 Analyze the events that contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union and other communist governments in Europe, including the growth of resistance movements in Eastern Europe, the policies of Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan, and the failures of communist economic systems.

4TH NINE WEEKS

1. 7-6.1 Summarize the political and social impact of the collapse/dissolution of the Soviet Union and subsequent changes to European borders, including those of Russia and the Independent Republics, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia; the breakup of Yugoslavia; the reunification of Germany; and the birth of the European Union (EU).

2. 7-6.2 Compare features of nationalist and independence movements in different regions in the post–World War II period, including Mohandas Gandhi’s role in the non-violence movement for India’s independence, the emergence of nationalist movements in African and Asian countries, and the collapse of the apartheid system in South Africa.

3. 7-6.3 Explain the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, including the Persian Gulf War, the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

4. 7-6.4 Compare the social, economic, and political opportunities for women in various nations and societies around the world, including those in developing and industrialized nations and within societies dominated by religions.

5. 7-6.5 Explain the significance and impact of the information, technological, and communications revolutions, including the role of television, satellites, computers, and the Internet.

6. 7-6.6 Summarize the dangers to the natural environment that are posed by population growth, urbanization, and industrialization, including global influences on the environment and the efforts by citizens and governments to protect the natural environment.

7. Review (Covering Various Standards)