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Week Breakdown
Week of 11/04/2019
Monday: Review India with Kahoot
Tuesday: Social Studies Benchmark
Wednesday: Start ancient China notes
Thursday: Finish ancient China notes
Friday: Silk road activity
Have a great weekend!
Homework Policy
Students will only have homework if they...
-Did not finish classwork because they were not focused on their work. Respect class time and I will respect after school time.
-Have to study for a test or a quiz.
-Have a project that needs time outside of class to complete.

I will try my best to make sure students have the appropriate time to finish work during my class. I respect both students and parents time at home and know that time is valuable.
Class Expectations
-Be Prompt
-Be Prepared
-Be Polite
-Be Productive
-Be Positive
Bell Schedule 2018-2019
8:15- 8:25 Homeroom
8:25- 9:17 1st Period
9:20-10:12 2nd Period
10:15-11:07 3rd Period
11:10-12:40 4th Period (This includes lunch)
12:43-1:35 5th Period
1:15-2:02 6th Period
2:33-3:25 7th Period
6th Grade Social Studies Standards

GRADE 6

Early Cultures to 1600

Standard 6-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the development of the cradles of civilization as people moved from a nomadic existence to a settled life.

Enduring Understanding

The first humans were nomads who continually traveled in search of food. As these hunter-gatherers developed better ways of doing things, they began to develop into the world’s earliest civilizations. Civilized societies have established written languages, permanent structures, forms of government, dependence on agriculture, and specializations of labor. These societies have also developed customs such as formal religions and traditions in family structure, food, and clothing that have endured. To understand how early civilizations evolved, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6-1.1 Explain the characteristics of hunter-gatherer groups and their relationship to the natural environment.

6-1.2 Explain the emergence of agriculture and its effect on early human communities, including the domestication of plants and animals, the impact of irrigation techniques, and subsequent food surpluses.

6-1.3 Compare the river valley civilizations of the Tigris and Euphrates (Mesopotamia), the Nile (Egypt), the Indus (India), and the Huang He (China), including the evolution of written language, government, trade systems, architecture, and forms of social order.

6-1.4 Explain the origins, fundamental beliefs, and spread of Eastern religions, including Hinduism (India), Judaism (Mesopotamia), Buddhism (India), and Confucianism and Taoism (China). Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Interpret parallel time lines from different places and cultures.

 Identify and explain multiple causation and multiple effects.

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.



Standard 6-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of life in ancient civilizations and their contributions to the modern world.

Enduring Understanding

The foundations of government, science, technology, and the arts are legacies of ancient civilizations. To understand that the contributions of these ancient civilizations have endured and are evident in our society today, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6-2.1 Describe the development of ancient Greek culture (the Hellenic period), including the concept of citizenship and the early forms of democracy in Athens.

6-2.2 Analyze the role of Alexander the Great (Hellenistic period), Socrates, Plato, Archimedes, Aristotle, and others in the creation and spread of Greek governance, literature, philosophy, the arts, math, and science.

6-2.3 Describe the development of Roman civilization, including language, government, architecture, and engineering.

6-2.4 Describe the expansion and transition of the Roman government from monarchy to republic to empire, including the roles of Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar (Octavius).

6-2.5 Explain the decline and collapse of the Roman Empire and the impact of the Byzantine Empire, including the Justinian Code and the preservation of ancient Greek and Roman learning, architecture, and government.

6-2.6 Compare the polytheistic belief systems of the Greeks and the Romans with the origins, foundational beliefs, and spread of Christianity. Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Interpret parallel time lines from different places and cultures.

 Identify and explain the relationships among multiple causes and multiple effects.

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.

 Explain how political, social, and economic institutions are similar or different across time and/or throughout the world.



Standard 6-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of changing political, social, and economic cultures in Asia.

Enduring Understanding

Asian cultures were developing in ways both similar to and different from those in other parts of the world. The cultures of China, India, Japan, and the Middle East influenced each other’s growth and development as well as that of the rest of the world. To understand the contributions of Asian societies that have endured and are evident in our society today, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6-3.1 Summarize the major contributions of the Chinese civilization from the Qing dynasty through the Ming dynasty, including the golden age of art and literature, the invention of gunpowder and woodblock printing, and the rise of trade via the Silk Road.

6-3.2 Summarize the major contributions of the Japanese civilization, including the Japanese feudal system, the Shinto traditions, and works of art and literature.

6-3.3 Summarize the major contributions of India, including those of the Gupta dynasty in mathematics, literature, religion, and science.

6-3.4 Explain the origin and fundamental beliefs of Islam and the geographic and economic aspects of its expansion. Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Interpret parallel time lines from different places and cultures.

 Identify and explain the relationships among multiple causes and multiple effects.

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.

 Explain how political, social, and economic institutions are similar or different across time and/or throughout the world.



Standard 6-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the changing political, social, and economic cultures in Africa and the Americas.

Enduring Understanding

African and American cultures were developing independently in ways similar to and different from those in other parts of the world. These cultures also influenced the development of the rest of the world. To understand that the contributions of African and American cultures have endured and are evident in our society today, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6.4.1 Compare the major contributions of the African civilizations of Ghana, Mali, and Songhai, including the impact of Islam on the cultures of these kingdoms.

6-4.2 Describe the influence of geography on trade in the African kingdoms, including the salt and gold trades.

6-4.3 Compare the contributions and the decline of the Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations in Central and South America, including their forms of government and their contributions in mathematics, astronomy, and architecture.

6-4.4 Explain the contributions, features, and rise and fall of the North American ancestors of the numerous Native American tribes, including the Adena, Hopewell, Pueblo, and Mississippian cultures. Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Interpret parallel time lines from different places and cultures.

 Select or design appropriate forms of social studies resources* to organize and evaluate social studies information.



* Social studies resources include the following: texts, calendars, timelines, maps, mental maps, charts, tables, graphs, flow charts, diagrams, photographs, illustrations, paintings, cartoons, architectural drawings, documents, letters, censuses, artifacts, models, geographic models, aerial photographs, satellite-produced images, and geographic information systems.

Standard 6-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the Middle Ages and the emergence of nation-states in Europe.

Enduring Understanding

Political systems are made up of the people, practices, and institutions that use power to make and enforce decisions. Feudalism during the Middle Ages in Europe was a political and economic system in which control of land was the main source of power. To understand feudalism and its relationship to the development of the European nation-states, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6-5.1 Explain feudalism and its relationship to the development of European monarchies and nation-states, including feudal relationships, the daily lives of peasants and serfs, and the economy under the manorial system.

6-5.2 Explain the effects of the Magna Carta on European society, its effect on the feudal system, and its contribution to the development of representative government in England.

6-5.3 Summarize the course of the Crusades and explain their effects on feudalism and their role in spreading Christianity.

6-5.4 Explain the role and influence of the Roman Catholic Church in medieval Europe.

6-5.5 Summarize the origins and impact of the bubonic plague (Black Death) on feudalism. Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.

 Analyze evidence, arguments, claims, and beliefs.

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Identify and explain the relationships among multiple causes and multiple effects.





Standard 6-6: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Exploration on Europe and the rest of the world.

Enduring Understanding

The Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Exploration were times of great discovery and learning that affected the way individuals viewed themselves and the world around them. To understand the connections among the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the exploration of the world, the student will utilize the knowledge and skills set forth in the following indicators:

Indicators

6-6.1 Summarize the contributions of the Italian Renaissance, including the importance of Florence, the influence of humanism and the accomplishments of the Italians in art, music, literature, and architecture.

6-6.2 Identify key figures of the Renaissance and the Reformation and their contributions (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Johannes Gutenberg, John Calvin, and Martin Luther).

6-6.3 Explain the causes, events, and points of contention and denominational affiliations (of nations) of the Reformation and the Catholic Reformation (Counter Reformation).

6-6.4 Compare the economic, political, and religious incentives of the various European countries to explore and settle new lands.

6-6.5 Identify the origin and destinations of the voyages of major European explorers.

6-6.6 Explain the effects of the exchange of plants, animals, diseases, and technology throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas (known as the Columbian Exchange). Social Studies Literacy Skills for the Twenty-First Century

 Compare the locations of places, the conditions at places, and the connections between places.

 Analyze evidence, arguments, claims, and beliefs.

 Explain change and continuity over time and across cultures.

 Identify and explain the relationships among multiple causes and multiple effects.

 Apply economic decision making to understand how limited resources necessitate choices.
6th Grade Syllabus
Sixth Grade Early Cultures: Prehistory to Exploration

Keeli Wofford
Edgewood Middle School

Email: kwofford@greenwood52.org



Social Studies in grade sixth is the study of people and events before the era of European exploration and settlement. It focuses on the development of the human story but also on the everyday lives, problems, and accomplishments of the people and their roles in developing social, economic, and political structures of the major civilizations. This curriculum was designed in accordance with S.C. sixth grade social studies standards. Students will write the standards of each unit and objective we begin in their notebook. The standards for each objective we are currently working on will be posted in the classroom as well.



This syllabus should be read by the student and their parents and placed in the front of the social studies section in binder.



I. Course Overview-

a. First nine weeks: the transition of humans from nomadic to settled life in the cradles of civilization, and the life in ancient classical civilizations and their contributions to the modern world.



b. Second nine weeks: Ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, and the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.



c. Third nine weeks: The Middle Ages and the emergence of the nation-states.



d. Fourth nine weeks: Changing political, social, and economic cultures in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas, the Renaissance and the Reformation on Europe and rest of the world, and the age of European exploration and settlement in the New World.



II. Textbook: Discovering Our Past: A History of the World/ Early Ages McGraw-Hill. Username and Password access to the online materials will be given by me. If you are having issues please contact me. https://connected.mcgraw-hill.com/connected/login.do is the login for the online book.



III. Materials Needed:

a. Binder for all classes, (provided)

b. filler paper and 5 dividers

c. pencils (mechanical allowed)

d. index cards for vocabulary all year (keep on hand)











IV. Grading

A= 90-100

B= 80-89

C=70-79

D=60-69

F=59<



VI. Assessments

Students will be assessed a number of ways through test, projects, quizzes, teacher led discussion, Question and Answer, groups etc. It is my discretion whether an assessment will be put in the grade book.

-Pop quizzes will be given to ensure students are studying on a daily basis.

-Tests are given when a unit is finished or the Pace of each class. They are not given on a specific date until I have a good assessment of where the students are at.

-Projects are usually done in class. There will be enough time given in class so if they are working at home they are not utilizing their time efficiently in class.

-Homework is only given if they are not using time wisely in class. They should spend time studying vocabulary and preparing for quizzes or tests.

-Classwork will be vocabulary, copying notes, listening and participating in classroom activities



VII. Internet

The students will be required to use the internet for educational purposes. If your child does not have internet at home there are opportunities for your child to use the internet at school to get work done. Not having internet is not an excuse for missing assignments. For those experiencing difficulty with internet or not having internet please see me for assistance and certain arrangements can be provided.

-Websites that are used for educational purposes are www.kahoot.com , www.connected.mcgraw-hill.com, Parents are encouraged to link to their child’s account.

VIII. Extra Help
I am available for extra help on before class, during lunch, or after school.
Grading Scale and Extra Help
100-90 A
89-80 B
79-70 C
69-60 D
59-Below F

*If you need extra help I am available for tutoring every morning (except Fridays) from 7:50-8:15 and after school. Please let me know ahead of time if you would like to stay after school.*